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Инстаграм National Geographic: наша планета прекрасна!

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Снимки Nation­al Geo­graph­ic уже почти сто лет являют собой легенду фотографии. Изображения из инстаграма @natgeo — напоминание нам о том, что наша планета чертовски красива и разнообразна! За один день в аккаунте могут появиться снимки ужина при свечах в Лаосе, орлов, тусующихся со львами в Ботсване, протестов в Балтиморе и эскимоса возле полярного круга.

n_zah

Pho­to by @mattiasklumofficial While dri­ving towards Ice­land’s incred­i­ble glacial lake Jökul­sár­lón, a dra­mat­ic after­noon light graced me with its pres­ence. Please go to @mattiasklumofficial to see anoth­er vol­canic land­scape from Ice­land that I shot from a heli­copter. This moun­tain mas­sif is quite close to the edge of Vat­na­jökull Nation­al Park. Work­ing with land­scape pho­tog­ra­phy is very med­i­ta­tive to me and charges my soul and mind! I have many favourite places and Ice­land is def­i­nite­ly one of them. #jökul­sár­lón #vat­na­jökull #land­scape #pho­tog­ra­phy #fin­eart #cli­mate #ipcc #klum #pho­tog­ra­ph­er @mattiasklumofficial @natgeo @natgeocreative @thephotosociety

Фото опубликовано Nation­al Geo­graph­ic (@natgeo)

This is what corn seed looks like when it is treat­ed with the neon­i­coti­noid pes­ti­cide Chloth­i­an­i­din. Each col­or indi­cates a dif­fer­ent con­cen­tra­tion of the pes­ti­cide. Neon­i­coti­noids have been get­ting a lot of scruti­ny late­ly because they have been found to be very harm­ful to hon­ey­bees. For exam­ple, one of the pur­ple corn seeds shown here has enough pes­ti­cide to kill 100,000 bees if they came in direct con­tact with it. The tricky part is, bees typ­i­cal­ly don’t come in direct con­tact with treat­ed seed since they are plant­ed direct­ly under­ground. Instead, the pes­ti­cide pen­e­trates the seed and becomes incor­po­rat­ed into all of the plant’s tis­sue. So bees come into con­tact with low dos­es over longer peri­ods of time as they col­lect con­t­a­m­i­nat­ed pollen. In the lab, low dos­es have been shown to kill hon­ey­bee lar­vae and affect their nav­i­ga­tion abil­i­ties. How­ev­er, it is hard­er to prove what is going on out in the field. On top of that, neon­i­coti­noids were designed to replace old­er pes­ti­cides that were more harm­ful to humans and oth­er ver­te­brates. So it turns into a com­pli­cat­ed trade-off when it comes to reg­u­lat­ing these chem­i­cals. Pho­tographed by Anand Var­ma (@anandavarma) for the hon­ey­bee sto­ry in the May 2015 issue of @natgeo. #onas­sign­ment #hon­ey­bee #pes­ti­cides #chem­i­cals @thephotosociety #corn #neon­ics

Фото опубликовано Nation­al Geo­graph­ic (@natgeo)

pho­to by @randyolson | words by @neilshea13 — Rain fell in the after­noon, turn­ing the earth into slime and the water into oxblood. We took the boat upriv­er and lat­er, return­ing, came upon this puz­zle: on the steep shore ahead a woman shout­ed to a naked man who stood in the riv­er grip­ping the horn of a ter­ri­fied cow. Only the cow’s head broke water. Its eyes rolled, nos­trils flared, it moaned and moaned. The riv­er did this—you were always slid­ing from one sto­ry into the next, swift through the country’s unfin­ished busi­ness. Rarely did you know why some­thing start­ed or how it turned out. The man was try­ing to haul the white beast ashore. As it hap­pened, he was just a good Samar­i­tan. He’d been strolling past on his way to a par­ty, his hair rich­ly shaped with but­ter and clay. He heard the woman shout­ing, and so came over to look. Now he was soaked, and the cow was mad. Every time he caught the dumb beast it lunged away and swam out toward deep water where croc­o­diles wait­ed. Any­one might have been angry, but riv­er peo­ple are also cat­tle peo­ple, and lat­er the man said this: Imag­ine how it looked to the cow. No earth beneath your hooves, no answer from your herd, the sky a mean gray gash. Every breath drowns you a lit­tle more and you have no words for the ter­ror down below. Well. Even­tu­al­ly he caught the cow and we jumped down and togeth­er dragged it out. I thought the ani­mal would die right then but it did­n’t. The woman shook our hands in thanks and then went over to the shud­der­ing crea­ture. She laid her palm on its head, pulled its damp hair through her fin­gers. You idiot, she said. We are so far from home. For the last six years, Randy Olson and I have been doc­u­ment­ing cul­ture, change, and con­flict in the water­shed that con­nects south­ern Ethiopia and north­ern Kenya. In the August issue of @natgeo mag­a­zine we’ll pub­lish the lat­est in our series, #NGwa­ter­shed­sto­ries. Join us at @randyolson and @neilshea13 as we fol­low water through the desert. #2009 #africa #ethiopia #omoriv­er #kara #hamar #rivers #cow #water #ani­mals @geneticislands #doc­u­men­tary #every­dayafrica #every­dayev­ery­where #jour­nal­ism #instaes­say #nat­geo @thephotosociety

Фото опубликовано Nation­al Geo­graph­ic (@natgeo)

pho­to by @randyolson | words by @neilshea13 — A few years lat­er George W. Bush would come to this place. After he left office. For vaca­tion. Sev­er­al black heli­copters thump­ing over the desert. He stayed two days. Camped where we camped, met peo­ple we had known. Along the Omo he was admired. Peo­ple thought him strong and wished him well. Not many Mus­lims in that low coun­try. Of course, his arrival meant he knew. The riv­er world was end­ing and he want­ed to see it. Strange to think of him rest­ing in the evenings on the high bank where we caught cat­fish and killed them with a shov­el. Where each morn­ing the green mon­keys pissed on our tents and once, while I stood under the buck­et show­er, army ants crawled up my legs and on sig­nal start­ed bit­ing every­thing. I ran out from the greasy stream naked and curs­ing, white boy on fire, cov­ered in welts big as quar­ters. Bet that didn’t hap­pen to W. Truth is, I’d love to know how he saw it. Who he spoke to. If he paint­ed and what. Did he even bring his oils, his easel, his wife? No one down there would’ve asked him any tough ques­tions. They would’ve been gen­er­ous, curi­ous. Maybe they heard he owned a ranch. Maybe they heard he owned cat­tle. He might’ve talked about that. Every­one would have cir­cled in to lis­ten. They’d have asked How many head do you have? Of what kind and col­or? And when the pres­i­dent had fin­ished his account­ing no doubt some­one in back would’ve laughed and said That’s noth­ing! Tell us about your wives! For the last six years, Randy Olson and I have been doc­u­ment­ing cul­ture, change, and con­flict in the water­shed that con­nects south­ern Ethiopia and north­ern Kenya. In the August issue of @natgeo mag­a­zine we’ll pub­lish the lat­est in our series, #NGwa­ter­shed­sto­ries. Join us at @randyolson and @neilshea13 as we fol­low water through the desert. #2009 #africa #ethiopia #omoriv­er #kwegu #life #rivers #con­ser­va­tion @geneticislands #doc­u­men­tary #every­dayafrica #pres­i­dent #georgew­bush #jour­nal­ism #instaes­say #nat­geo @thephotosociety

Фото опубликовано Nation­al Geo­graph­ic (@natgeo)

Pho­to by @mattiasklumofficial Shar­ing is car­ing! I pho­tographed this polar bear female and her cub enjoy­ing a seal meal in Sval­bard. At birth, the polar bear cubs only weigh about 500 to 700 g (17−25 oz.) and are about 30 cm (12 in.) long. Males are usu­al­ly born slight­ly larg­er than females. Please go to @mattiasklumofficial to see who got the left­overs from this meal! The aver­age fat con­tent of polar bear milk is 33%, sim­i­lar to the milk­fat of oth­er marine mam­mals. For com­par­i­son, human milk has a 3–5% fat con­tent. Cubs begin eat­ing sol­id food as soon as their moth­er makes her first kill on the sea ice , about three to four months of age. The cubs grow very quick­ly on their moth­er’s fat rich milk and on seal blub­ber. By eight months of age, they weigh more than 45 kg (99 lb.).Mother polar bears are known to be extreme­ly pro­tec­tive of their young, even risk­ing their own lives in their cubs“ defense. #meal #seal #polar­bear #pro­tectwildlife #con­ser­va­tion­pho­tog­ra­phy #sval­bard #mat­ti­asklum #pro­tectt­hearc­tic #stop­cli­mat­e­change #un #iucn #pho­toofthe­day @thephotosociety @mattiasklumofficial @natgeocreative @bigworldsmallplanet @natgeo

Фото опубликовано Nation­al Geo­graph­ic (@natgeo)

pho­to by @randyolson | words by @neilshea13 — In the old days, when my father was a child, we didn’t have rifles. We car­ried spears and clubs, and rifles were for white men and sol­diers. But slow­ly they came in from the west, from Sudan, and every­thing changed. We Mur­si live on the far side of the Omo and there are no bridges, so we were among the last to get them. For a while it was very bad. Back then, if hot-heads came down­riv­er with guns, they took what they want­ed. No sense could reach them, no speech was sweet in their ears. Many times we were vic­tims and could only run into the bush or die. Now, we have rifles and our ene­mies think twice. Every­one thinks twice. Lis­ten, a man must have these things: land, cat­tle, chil­dren. With­out land you can­not feed the cat­tle. With­out cat­tle you can­not pay for a bride. With­out a bride you will not have chil­dren. Lack­ing these things leaves a man feel­ing hun­gry. Only when he has them all can he be tak­en seri­ous­ly. And then he picks up a rifle to defend them. Do you under­stand? Yes, it’s true that the for­est has become qui­eter. Guns changed that, too. There were once many animals—buffalo, gazelles, lions, leop­ards. Ele­phants were very dan­ger­ous and some­times crashed through the vil­lage. On the riv­er hip­pos were most sav­age of all. Today the hunters find far few­er ani­mals, and a kind of silence waits in the bush. But I won’t say it’s bad. Fools and white men may miss the lion. Mis­sion­ar­ies may talk of mer­cy. I can show you a place where bones still cov­er the ground, and that is the silence I remem­ber. For the last six years, Randy Olson and I have been doc­u­ment­ing cul­ture, change, and con­flict in the water­shed that con­nects south­ern Ethiopia and north­ern Kenya. In the August issue of @natgeo mag­a­zine we’ll pub­lish the lat­est in our series, #NGwa­ter­shed­sto­ries. Join us at @randyolson and @neilshea13 as we fol­low water through the desert. #2009 #africa #ethiopia #omoriv­er #mur­si #ak47 #guns #hunt­ing #life #rivers #con­ser­va­tion @geneticislands #doc­u­men­tary #every­dayafrica #por­trait #jour­nal­ism #instaes­say #nat­geo @thephotosociety

Фото опубликовано Nation­al Geo­graph­ic (@natgeo)

pho­to by @randyolson | words by @neilshea13 — One day he went into the for­est alone. He had in mind what he want­ed. Not every boy knows with such clar­i­ty who he prefers for a com­pan­ion but he had decid­ed on a baboon. The boy some­how cap­tured the ani­mal. The details are vague. This is what he said. To tell you the truth, I don’t believe it. Though he had a cer­tain kind of courage no boy this small has any busi­ness chas­ing dan­ger­ous ani­mals around so far out­side the Suri vil­lage. Espe­cial­ly not in the nurs­eries of big moth­er baboons, which are all teeth and ban­shee shriek­ing. In any case the begin­ning is irrel­e­vant. There is always a boy like this, and a baboon with­out a name. For a while they would be great friends. Every­day they wan­dered and played togeth­er. House to house, aunt to aunt, ask­ing food, wast­ing time. They are com­ing to be almost the same age, human and baboon lives pass­ing like satel­lites, their orbits near­ing, near­ing. In the after­noons they walked in long cool shad­ows, just the pair of them. In the evenings the baboon slept curled beside him. It was sad­dest because you knew it couldn’t last. After this brief perigee the baboon would grow big­ger, stronger, sur­pass­ing the boy’s young courage, will­ful and unpre­dictable as every­thing that lives. Then the deci­sion so far sus­pend­ed would come down, and it would not be the boy’s to make. But let’s don’t talk about that. The day­dream can play out a lit­tle longer. See how the boy has paint­ed its face. See how it holds him, how it desires to be held. This is a dream you will rec­og­nize, one we’ve shared. To be under­stood for a moment beyond words. For the last six years, Randy Olson and I have been doc­u­ment­ing cul­ture, change, and con­flict in the water­shed that con­nects south­ern Ethiopia and north­ern Kenya. In the August issue of @natgeo mag­a­zine we’ll pub­lish the lat­est in our series, #NGwa­ter­shed­sto­ries. Join us at @randyolson and @neilshea13 as we fol­low water through the desert. #2009 #africa #ethiopia #omoriv­er #suri #baboon #tra­di­tion #rivers #con­ser­va­tion @geneticislands #doc­u­men­tary #insta­jour­nal­ism #instaes­say #takenotes #nat­geo @thephotosociety #por­trait

Фото опубликовано Nation­al Geo­graph­ic (@natgeo)

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